Car Batteries Group Size (The Ultimate Guide)

Knowing your car’s battery group size is crucial for selecting the right replacement battery.

Using the wrong battery group size can result in poor performance, decreased lifespan, or even damage to your vehicle’s electrical system.

This is why it is important to understand the different types of car batteries and what group size you need for your vehicle.

Car Batteries Group Size – What Does it Mean?

Car battery group size refers to the physical dimensions of a car battery, specifically its length, width, height, and terminal location. It is used as a standard to ensure compatibility between different car models and battery brands.

Car Battery Types & Group Sizes

So now that we’ve established the importance of car batteries and understanding their group size, let’s dive into the different types and sizes of car batteries available.

First, it’s essential to know that there are two main types of car batteries: flooded lead-acid batteries and sealed lead-acid batteries.

Flooded lead-acid batteries are the most common type found in cars and need to be periodically checked and refilled with distilled water. Sealed lead-acid batteries, on the other hand, are maintenance-free and don’t require water refills.

When it comes to group sizes, these batteries are standardized by the Battery Council International (BCI). The group size of a battery refers to its physical dimensions and location of the terminals.

Understanding the group size of a battery is important because it ensures that the battery will fit properly in the car’s battery tray and have the right terminal configurations.

Different car models have different requirements for battery group size, so it’s essential to check the owner’s manual or the specifications listed on the car itself.

The BCI has a helpful battery group size chart that can be used to cross-reference your car’s specifications with the available battery options. Some of the most common battery group sizes for cars include Group 24, Group 35, and Group 65.

It’s crucial to choose the correct battery group size for your car to ensure that it provides reliable starting power and operates optimally.

Using the wrong battery group size can result in issues like poor fit, reduced performance, and even damage to the battery and the car’s electrical system.

What Do Battery Group Numbers Mean?

As we dive deeper into the world of car batteries, it’s important to understand what the group numbers mean.

Group numbers are a standardized way of classifying the physical size and terminal locations of batteries. They were developed to ensure that the right battery is used in the right vehicle.

The BCI has established a battery group size chart that lists the most common group sizes and their corresponding dimensions.

This chart is a helpful reference when shopping for a replacement battery, as you can easily compare the group size of your old battery to the options available in the market.

The group number is usually stamped on the battery itself, or it can be found in your vehicle’s owner’s manual or online. 

Here is the table of car batteries group size and their dimensions:

BCI Group Size NumberL (inches)W (inches)H (inches)L (mm)W (mm) H (mm)
 21 8-3/16 6-13/16 8-3/4 208 173 222
 22F 9-1/2 6-7/8 8-5/16 241 175 211
 22HF 9-1/2 6-7/8 9-1/2 241 175 229
 22NF 9-7/16 5-1/2 8-15/16 240 140 227
 22R 9 6-7/8 8-5/16 229 175 211
 24 10-1/4 6-13/16 8-7/8 260 173 225
 24F 10-3/4 6-13/16 9 273 173 229
 24H 10-1/4 6-13/16 9-3/8 260 173 238
 24R 10-1/4 6-13/16 9 260 173 229
 24T 10-1/4 6-13/16 9-3/4 260 173 248
 25 9-1/16 6-7/8 8-7/8 230 175 225
 26 8-3/16 6-13/16 7-3/4 208 173 197
 26R 8-3/16 6-13/16 7-3/4 208 173 197
 27 12-1/16 6-13/16 8-7/8 306 173 225
 27F 12-1/2 6-13/16 8-15/16 318 173 227
 27H 11-3/4 6-13/16 9-1/4 298 173 235
 29NF 13 5-1/2 8-15/16 330 140 227
 33 13-5/16 6-13/16 9-3/8 338 173 238
 34 10-1/4 6-13/16 7-7/8 260 173 200
 34R 10-1/4 6-13/16 7-7/8 260 173 200
 35 9-1/16 6-7/8 8-7/8 230 175 225
 36R 10-3/8 7-1/4 8-1/8 263 183 206
 40R 10-15/16 6-7/8 6-7/8 277 175 175
 41 11-3/16 6-7/8 6-7/8 293 175 175
 42 9-5/16 6-13/16 6-13/16 243 173 173
 43 13-1/8 6-7/8 8-1/16 334 175 205
 45 9-7/16 5-1/2 8-15/16 240 140 227
 46 10-3/4 6-13/16 9 273 173 229
 47 9-11/16 6-7/8 7-1/2 246 175 190
 48 12-1/16 6-7/8 7-9/16 306 175 192
 49 15 6-7/8 7-3/16 381 175 192
 50 13-1/2 5 10 343 127 254
 51 9-3/8 5-1/16 8-13/16 238 129 223
 51R 9-3/8 5-1/16 8-13/16 238 129 223
 52 7-5/16 5-13/16 8-1/4 186 147 210
 53 13 4-11/16 8-1/4 330 119 210
 54 7-5/16 6-1/16 8-3/8 186 154 212
 55 8-5/8 6-1/16 8-3/8 218 154 212
 56 10 6-1/16 8-3/8 254 154 212
 57 8-1/16 7-3/16 6-15/16 205 183 177
 58 10-1/16 7-3/16 6-15/16 255 183 177
 58R 10-1/16 7-3/16 6-15/16 255 183 177
 59 10-1/16 7-5/8 7-3/4 255 193 196
 60 13-1/16 6-5/16 8-7/8 332 160 225
 61 7-9/16 6-3/8 8-7/8 192 162 225
 62 8-7/8 6-3/8 8-7/8 225 162 225
 63 10-3/16 6-3/8 8-7/8 258 162 225
 64 11-11/16 6-3/8 8-7/8 296 162 225
 65 12-1/16 7-1/2 7-9/16 306 190 192
 70 8-3/16 7-1/16 7-11/16 208 179 196
 71 8-3/16 7-1/16 8-1/2 208 179 216
 72 9-1/16 7-1/16 8-1/4 230 179 210
 73 9-1/167-1/16 8-1/2 230 179 216
 74 10-1/4 7-1/4 8-3/4 260 184 222
 75 9-1/16 7-1/16 7-11/16 230 179 196
 76 13-1/8 7-1/16 8-1/2 334 179 216
 78 10-1/4 7-1/16 7-11/16 260 179 196
 85 9-1/16 6-13/16 8 230 173 203
 86 9-1/16 6-13/16 8 230 173 203
 90 9-11/16 6-7/8 6-7/8 246 175 175
 91 11 6-7/8 6-7/8 280 175 175
 92 12-1/2 6-7/8 6-7/8 317 175 175
 93 15 6-7/8 6-7/8 354 175 175
 95R 15-9/16 6-7/8 7-1/2 394 175 190
 96R 9-9/16 6-13/16 6-7/8 242 173 175
 97R 9-15/16 6-7/8 7-1/2 252 175 190
 98R 11-3/16 6-7/8 7-1/2 283 175 190

How to Determine Your Car’s Battery Group Size

Understanding the battery group size of your car is crucial in ensuring that you have the right battery to power your vehicle.

Steps to Identifying Your Car’s Battery Group Size

In order to determine your car’s battery group size, you’ll need to follow a few steps.

Firstly, you’ll want to consult your car’s owner manual. This manual will often include the specific battery group size required for your car, so it’s a good place to start.

Additionally, you can look up your car’s battery specifications online.

Simply type in your car’s make and model, along with “battery specifications” in your preferred search engine, and you should be able to find the information you need.

How to Read Your Car’s Battery Specification

Once you have the battery specifications for your car, you’ll want to take a closer look at the information provided.

The battery group size is usually listed as a number and/or a letter.

For example, the battery group size may be listed as “Group 24” or “24F.” This information will tell you the specific dimensions of the battery that will fit in your car’s battery tray.

Importance of Getting the Correct Battery Group Size

It’s important to note that the battery group size is different from the battery type, such as AGM or flooded.

You’ll need to make sure that you have the right battery group size in order to fit the battery in your car’s battery tray.

Additionally, the right battery group size will also ensure that the battery has the right amount of cranking power to start your car.

In short, getting the correct battery group size is crucial to the performance and safety of your vehicle.

Does Battery Group Size Really Matter?

Understanding whether battery group size matters is a crucial aspect of selecting the right lead-acid battery for your car.

There are several factors to consider when determining whether the battery group size is important.

Firstly, the group size of a battery refers to the physical dimensions and terminal locations.

This means that if you have a car with a specific battery group size, a battery from a different group size may not physically fit in your car’s battery tray.

This can cause problems, such as the battery not being properly secured, which can lead to electrical issues or even a dead battery.

Additionally, the group size of a battery can also impact its performance.

A battery with a larger group size will typically have a higher reserve capacity, meaning that it can store more energy.

This is important, as the reserve capacity is a measure of how long a battery can run your car’s electrical system without being recharged by the alternator.

A battery with a higher reserve capacity will provide more reliable starting power and be able to power your car’s electrical system for a longer period of time.

So, to answer the question, “does battery group size really matter?” The answer is a resounding yes!

A battery with the incorrect group size can cause problems with the physical fit, as well as potentially impacting the performance of your car’s electrical system.

It is important to ensure that you are using the correct battery group size for your car to ensure reliable starting power and to avoid any potential problems.

Mixing Battery Group Sizes

Okay, let’s talk about the topic of mixing battery group sizes.

To begin with, it’s important to understand that batteries are not just interchangeable components, and there are several factors that can affect their performance and compatibility.

Can You Mix Battery Group Sizes?

Mixing battery group sizes, as the name suggests, means installing a battery that has a different group size from the original battery specified for your vehicle.

This can be done for various reasons, such as needing a battery with a higher capacity, trying to save space, or simply because a battery of a different group size was accidentally purchased.

Potential Consequences of Mixing Battery Group Sizes

However, it’s crucial to understand that this can have serious consequences and is generally not recommended.

Mixing battery group sizes can result in the battery not fitting properly in the battery tray or not being able to connect securely to the cables and terminals.

This can cause various issues, such as reduced performance, decreased battery life, or even a dead battery. In the worst-case scenario, mixing battery group sizes can also result in a dangerous situation, such as a battery fire or an electrical short circuit.

Recommendations for Using the Correct Battery Group Size

Therefore, if you’re considering installing a battery of a different group size in your vehicle, it’s essential to consult with a trusted mechanic or a battery specialist.

They will be able to assess your specific situation and provide you with a professional and safe solution.

In general, it’s best to stick with the original battery group size specified for your vehicle, unless you have a compelling reason to do otherwise.

Mixing battery group sizes can have significant consequences and is generally not recommended.

If you’re considering installing a battery of a different group size, it’s essential to seek professional advice and to ensure that you do it safely and correctly.

Differences Between Battery Group Sizes

When it comes to car batteries, there are a number of factors that can impact performance, but the group size of a battery is a particularly important consideration.

Essentially, the group size of a battery refers to the physical dimensions of the battery, and it’s important to choose the correct group size for your vehicle because it impacts the amount of power that your battery can deliver, as well as its ability to fit properly in your vehicle’s battery compartment.

Can You Use a Different Group Size Battery?

When you’re looking at the differences between battery group sizes, it’s important to consider factors like the width, length, and height of the battery, as well as the location of the battery terminals.

Larger batteries typically deliver more power and have a longer lifespan, but they may be too large to fit in some vehicles, so it’s important to do your research and find the right size for your needs.

On the other hand, smaller batteries may be more compact, but they may not be able to provide the same level of performance and power that you need, particularly if you drive in hot weather or if you use a lot of electronics in your vehicle.

The group size of a car battery can have a significant impact on performance and longevity, so it’s important to choose the right size for your vehicle.

If you’re not sure what size you need, you can consult your vehicle’s owner’s manual or reach out to a professional for assistance.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the type and size of your car’s battery are important considerations when choosing the right one for your vehicle.

Lead-acid batteries come in different types, including flooded, AGM, and Gel, each with their own pros and cons.

The battery group size, on the other hand, determines the physical dimensions of the battery and its electrical specifications, including cold cranking amps and reserve capacity.

To determine your car’s battery group size, you can refer to your owner’s manual, check the battery specifications listed in the hood, or consult a professional.

It’s also important to note that while it’s generally recommended to choose a battery group size that matches your car’s specifications, you may still opt for a larger size if you want more power.

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